Gazetteer

If you are a newcomer to North West Wales perhaps a brief glance through our gazetteer of some of the towns and villages in the area would be beneficial and you can always click back here to check out some background if a particular property catches your eye. The great many of you who are regular visitors to the Principality can go straight to our properties to let section.

The information included here should not be taken as 100% factual – i.e. don’t blame us if a rural sub post office has closed since this information was drafted.

THE LLEYN PENINSULA…

Some twenty miles long and only eight or nine miles at it’s widest. Most of the peninsula coastline is designated as being in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (and rightly so!)…

Aberdaron…

almost at the end of the Peninsula. Medieval pilgrims en route to Bardsey Island (Ynys Enlli) stayed here before making the last leg of their journey to the island. The village has an excellent sandy beach, two pubs, small mini-market and a general stores.

Abersoch…

a Mecca for water sports enthusiasts and one of the most sought-after holiday destinations in the UK. The village has golf, fishing, pony-trekking, sailing, excellent choice of hotel/restaurants, pubs, superb sandy beaches.

Llanbedrog…

A “two-tier” village midway between Abersoch and Pwllheli. The Upper half of the village has a sub post-office and a country pub whilst Lower Llanbedrog has a pub and a wonderful stretch of sandy beach.

Mynytho…

village in an elevated setting with fantastic views down to Cardigan Bay and St Tudwal’s Islands. The village has a well-stocked general store/post office and is only a mile or so from the centre of Abersoch.

Sarn Mellteyrn…

a rural village set in a valley in the centre of the Peninsula. Two pubs thrive…somehow! The village is home to a weekly farmer’s mart and is a suitable base for exploring the entire peninsula.

Sarn Bach…

a small hamlet outside Abersoch within a very short drive of the bustling village centre.

Bwlch Tocyn…

a small scattered hamlet at the western end of Abersoch’s wonderful sandy beach. A very short drive form the village centre (or even a walk across the golf links and beach!)

Llanengan…

a scattered hamlet with historic church, country pub and only a mile or so from Abersoch centre.

Llangian…

An Award Winning rural village a short drive from Abersoch centre. The village has a pretty church and small sub post-office.

Nefyn…

the largest town on the northern coast of the Peninsula is a former thriving fishing village with shops, pubs, excellent food, boating and beautiful beach.

Morfa Nefyn… just over a mile away from Nefyn is this other former fishing village which too has a lovely sandy beach (stretching round to Porthdinllaen), fine food and the awesome clifftop Nefyn golf course with superb views.

Porthdinllaen…

a National Trust owned hamlet with a pub on the beach and famous lifeboat station. In the 19thcentury the hamlet almost became the main packet port for ferry traffic between Ireland and mainland UK. A single vote in the House of Commons led to the then Anglesey village of Holyhead being chosen instead.

Edern

… an village inland from the northern side of the Peninsula. Village pub and licensed hotel.

Trefor…

in the lee of the towering Rivals mountains. Trefor was a thriving granite quarrying centre and now has a country hotel, beach and fishing. A good base for exploring the Peninsula.

Llangwnadl…

a scattered rural hamlet with  the renowned Porth Colmon beach.

Clynnog Fawr…

a mere dot on the map. A pub and petrol station/general stores are handy Almost equi-distant between Pwllheli and Caernarfon, the village has an ancient church dedicated to St Beuno and is steeped in history.

Pwllheli….

The “capital” of Lleyn! The town was granted a medieval charter by the Black Prince and has held a weekly outdoor market (some say the largest in Wales) ever since. The town has two beaches, leisure centre, 18 hole golf course, superb sailing at the new Hafan marina, fine restaurants, pubs and more. Pwllheli is the terminus of the Cambrian Coast railway line and is the main shopping centre for the peninsula. Historically the town was a former ship-building centre and it was in a Temperance Café in the town centre that Plaid Cymru – The Party of Wales was formed in the 1920s.

Llanystumdwy…

often quoted as being the birthplace of the Prime Minister Lloyd George (not so, he was born in Manchester but did spend his childhood in the village). Naturally, the village houses a museum in his memory, good food  and rabbit farm.

Criccieth…

a pretty Victorian town on Cardigan Bay with countless guest houses, super restaurants, railway station, beaches, golf, twice yearly fair, and a medieval castle perched on a rocky outcrop.

SNOWDONIA AND SURROUND….

The tallest mountain in England Wales is not just what Snowdonia is all about. Wooded valleys, cascading waterfalls, trickling streams, deep and tranquil lakes… it’s this and a whole lot more. The National Park stretches down towards mid-Wales and encompasses some of the most beautiful countryside in Europe.

Porthmadog…

a “new town” built on reclaimed land during the golden age of Welsh slate. These days the town is the ideal base from which to explore Snowdonia or the Lleyn and has a pretty harbour, Ffestiniog Railway, Welsh Mountain Railway, restaurants, shops, pubs and more. The nearest beach and golf are at nearby Morfa Bychan. Porthmadog has a leisure centre

Morfa Bychan…

a few miles out of Porthmadog (beyond Borth-Y-Gest) is Morfa Bychan village with the famous Black Rock Sands beach which stretch for miles (actually featured on the cover of a Manic Street Preachers album!), pub and Porthmadog’s golf club.

Tremadog…

an architect designed new town (built by William Madocks in the 19thcentury. The village has a choice of pubs and was once the home of Lawrence of Arabia.

Beddgelert…

who does not know the fabled tragedy of Prince Llywelyn and his faithful Irish wolfhound? The story was actually the creation on an enterprising local publican who used it to entertain spellbound tourists! Beddgelert is at the foot of Snowdon.

Nant Gwynant…

idyllic, beautiful, wonderfully scenic… you name it.

Llanberis…

one of the most popular locations in North Wales as it is home of the famous Snowdon Mountain Railway, Llyn Padarn lake with water sports, the Welsh Slate Museum, Electric Mountain, the Padarn Lake railway, excellent restaurants, pubs and shops.

Llanrug…

a mere dot on the map but with two very good pub/restaurants and a village mini-market. A great base for experiencing the delights of Snowdonia.

Caernarfon…

the wonderful county town of Gwynedd dates back to Roman times (or beyond!) and is home to the grand Caernarfon Castle built by Edward I is the 13thcentury as he strove to conquer the Welsh. Caernarfon was the scene of the Investiture of Prince Charles as Prince of Wales back in 1969 and almost became capital of the Principality in the 1950s. Nowadays the town hosts a weekly open air market, boasts boating facilities, is terminus of the Welsh Highland Railway and has many shops, restaurants and pubs. There is a golf course on the outskirts of town.

Felinheli…

on the Menai Strait and formerly Port Dinorwic the town sprang up as a slate exporting port and is now the home of a yachting marina, pubs and village shops. The village lies between Caernarfon and Bangor.

Bangor…

cathedral city with a university, shops galore, bus and rail links, excellent food and more. Bangor is perfectly placed for those who wish to explore Snowdonia and the Isle of Anglesey.

Dinas Dinlle…

the Award Winning Beach is just one reason for visiting the misnomic village on Caernarfon Bay. There is a pub, shop and café and Caernarfon Airport as well.

Penygroes and the Nantlle Valley…

a history steeped in slate. Great bases for the exploration of the National Park.

Ffestiniog…

pretty village in the Moelwyn mountains and ideal for walkers and climbers. Two pubs, village store etc.

Blaenau Ffestiniog…

with links by rail to Llandudno and via the Ffestiniog Railway down to the coast at Porthmadog. The town built up as one of North Wales’ biggest slate mining centres.

Betws Y Coed…

one of the most famous little towns in Wales. In the lovely Conwy valley with restaurant/hotels, pubs, shops and rail links.

Dolgellau…

the former county town Meirionnydd is a focal and shopping centre for South Snowdonia. Quaint shopping streets, weekly market and country-style pubs make it an excellent location for those wishing to enjoy the full splendour of the National Park.

Tywyn…

on the Cardigan Bay coast this is an attractive seaside town with shops, good food and pubs and is the terminus of the famous Tal-y-Llyn narrow gauge railway.

Aberdovey…

a delightful coastal little town with many attractions including golf course, boating, shops, pubs and good food.

Barmouth…

with miles of beach and a seafront promenade this is the absolute ideal setting for a beach holiday with the majestic mountains of Snowdonia as a back drop. Shops, inns and good food simply add to the appeal.

Harlech…

the old town is a criss-cross of small streets with shops and restaurants but it’s the majestic medieval castle that the town is famous for. On the coastal plain below is the Royal St David’s Golf course and the town’s leisure complex.

Penrhyndeudraeth…

a small town with shops and pubs and, set on the Glaslyn estuary, the famous Italianate village of Portmeirion which was the creation of Sir Clough Williams-Ellis. This village is still a centre of pilgrimage for fans of the 1960s cult-TV series “The Prisoner” which was filmed on location at Portmeirion.

THE NORTHERN COAST…

Cross the border from England and the A55 zips you along towards Anglesey and Ireland beyond. The North Wales Coast has a great many attractions and sites.

Conwy… the ancient town with its 13th century castle and thick town walls, yachting marina, Smallest House in Great Britain, quayside, shops, pubs and restaurants and historic bridges over the Conwy estuary.

Llandudno…

Victorian resort town in the lee of the mighty Great Orme and with miles of promenade and beach, great shopping, countless restaurants and pubs, two golf courses and rail links. No wonder the town is known as the “Queen of the North Wales resorts”.

Colwyn Bay…

further along the coast and home of the Welsh Mountain Zoo, Eirias Park sports centre, shops, restaurants, pubs and rail links.

Rhos-On-Sea…

very popular because of the wonderful beach and seafront. With the advent of the A55 Expressway from the north of England, Rhos is one of the Northern coast resorts to have been a benefit to holidaymakers.

Prestatyn…

quieter than Rhyl, busier than Rhos-On-Sea. Prestatyn seems to be the happy medium!

Rhyl…

a “resort” town in the real sense.

ANGLESEY…

Cross the Menai Strait on the Britannia or Telford bridges and you’ve got 125 miles of unspoilt coastline, more leisure centres per head of population than any other area in the UK, countless tourist attractions, miles of lovely beaches, lively coastal towns and sleepy inland villages… Anglesey is known as Mon Mam Cymru (the mother of Wales) because it was thought the crops the island produced could sustain the whole principality during ancient upheavals with England. The Druids retreated here in the face of Roman onslaught and Prince Llywelyn had his home and medieval court on the island.

Menai Bridge…(Porthaethwy) is the town that sprang up after the completion of Thomas Telford’ famous suspension bridge across the Menai Strait. Restaurants, pubs and shops abound.

Llanfair PG …

no, I’m not typing it in full!

Brynsiencyn…

home of a sea zoo, riding centre, animal farm attraction etc.

Newborough…

created in the 13thcentury as Edward I moved all the residents of villages around Beaumaris out of their homes to make room for his army of castle builders. Newborough has a great beach.

Aberffraw…

the ancient capital of Wales where Prince Llywelyn held his court. A coastal village with pubs and small shop.

Rhosneigr…

An Award Winning beach with a golf course, shops and more. The village is a Mecca for water sport enthusiasts.

Trearddur Bay…

see Rhosneigr and double it!

Holyhead…

the port is the main link between the UK and Ireland with two rival companies sailing back and forth to Dublin. Holyhead and Holyhead Mountain have a great deal to attract holidaymakers including golf at nearby Trearddur Bay, South Stack Lighthouse, shops, good food and more.

Cemaes Bay…

a coastal village with a lovely natural harbour, shops, pubs and good food.

Moelfre

… coastal village with a historic life-boat history.

Benllech… hustle and bustle, beautiful sandy beach, shops, good food, and more.

Llangefni…

the central market town is the island’s centre of administration and has a good selection of shops, pubs, good food, golf course and weekly open air market.

Beaumaris…

the home of Edward I’s 13thcentury castle, ancient prison, museum, shops, boating, good food, and more besides. Beaumaris (The Norman name for “beautiful marsh”) enjoys fantastic uninterrupted views across the Menai Strait to Snowdonia.